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0 thoughts on “Episode 50: Knitting is Sitting, Quilting is Moving

  • Birgit

    Hi Frances,
    I am back on the needle too. I did not knit for 2 years, because my fingers started to pickle after a few minutes of knitting.
    Last week I tried knitting an owl and nothing happened with my fingers! WOW
    No I decided to knit myself a owl sweater! jipie!
    Iยดll send you some pictures of the owl…!
    XO
    Birgit

  • Jaye

    Hi Frances,
    I was so thrilled to see two episodes on my iPod to which I could listen on my way home from the modern quilt guild meeting. I only got through one despite a massive police presence on the road I need to take home which resulted in a detour. I am standing in my kitchen at the counter while I wait for dinner to cook. If I go upstairs, it will burn. Here are some random comments from this episode and the previous one.
    -I just heard about the upheaval surrounding the Sherbet Pips fabric and have to say that I *try* to stick to the “if you don’t have something nice to say, don’t say anything at all”. I am not perfect, so it doesn’t always work, but I try. I was sorry to hear about this whole thing. After all, Aneela (???) is just a person like we are. I have seen some mean comments on Camille Roskelley’s blog and I think they stem from jealousy.
    -binding: I always look at the directions every time I make a binding or a sleeve. I don’t want to devote brain space to storing how to make those parts of the quilt. Don’t beat yourself up.
    -arm/repetitive strain: I have been dealing with a repetitive strain injury for a long time. I always have to be thinking about it. I have to make sure all my ergonomics are right (sewing machine and computer). I really started to get better when I started lifting weights (get some small ones from the Goodwill or thrift store) and going yoga. You are right the stretching helps a lot. Perhaps you have a counter at the right height so you can stand sometimes when you work on your books? I can only knit for about 20 minutes every 3-4 days. I don’t knit complicated projects. I also task switch a lot, because doing the same thing over and over seems to aggravate my arm and neck.

    JMO
    Jaye

  • Kristin

    Hi Frances,
    I’m not quite finished listening to your podcast yet- but felt the need to let you know about a little gadget I picked up at the Long Beach Quilt Show last year. It is called The Binding Tool- here is a link:
    http://www.missouriquiltco.com/the-binding-tool-by-tqm-products-inc.html

    It handles that scary part when you are about to join the two ends at the end of the quilt. It fits perfectly every time, with a nice diagonal seam. Here is a video of how it works:

    I personally find it easier to sew the binding on without pinning it first. I just line it up with my fingers as I go.

    Thanks again to the referral to my Sister’s adventures!

  • Am

    Hi Frances,

    I just listened to your newest podcast, and I really enjoyed it. I am new to the quilting world, and I dread any time spent away from my fabric (it is particulary hard when I go to work). I know that your podcast is going to ease the separation anxiety ๐Ÿ˜‰

    I especially appreciated your comments about being an introvert. I am also an introvert, and, even though I just graduated college, I never truly enjoyed parties because there simply were to many people around. It completely exhausted me, even more than studying for finals or writing a paper. I definitely wish that large groups of people didn’t affect me that way, but it was comforting to hear that I am not alone. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Thanks again!
    Amy

  • Sandi

    On pressing quilt binding in half: gave it up years ago, didn’t find it added anything to the process, just took time and made opportunities to burn myself (don’t need help with that!).

  • glogood

    I’m catching up on podcasts, and came accross your comments about canning and figs. I too have a very fruitful fig tree and make three types of jam… plain fig jam, pineapple walnut fig jam, and strawberry fig jam. The last two are wonderful as ice cream toppers too. I’d be happy to share my recipes if you’re interested. Just send me an email. ๐Ÿ™‚